VP-ASP :: Shopping Cart Software

Shopping Cart Software Solutions for anywhere in the World

US/Canada(Toll Free): +1 888 587 2278
Europe/UK: +44 (020) 7193 9408
Australia/New Zealand: +61 3 9016 4497

VP-ASP Shopping Cart Customer Forum

Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 VPCart Forum
 General help me questions
 Search Engine Questions
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

apswater
VP-ASP Super User

317 Posts

Posted - October 12 2005 :  15:20:49  Show Profile  Visit apswater's Homepage  Reply with Quote
ok, My system has a small problem with the search engines as all of them do. When the spiders come they start scanning all the links and eventually they come across a multi paged shopdisplayproducts output.
(when they click the list all products link)

What happens is that the spider grabs all the pages of the multipage display and indexes them in thier search engine.

so say they get a http://www.labwater.com/shopdisplayproducts.asp?Page2 or something like that. Now one of their clients searched something and gets a link to page 3 or any page that is lists from 1- to what ever... the client clicks the link and they get a page not found error because the original display info was stored in a session variable that is not there after the spider puts the link up.

1. Does this make sense.
2. How do we stop the spiders from grabbing the shopdisplayproducts pages but only the multiple ones?

I was able to excluded them on our in house engine seach spider by skipping over any link that has "shopdisplayproducts.asp?Page" but I do not know how to do that for google and the rest... can anyone help?

I average several hundred - 500 server errors errors becasue of this a day. Look at your web logs and I bet you all see the same thing.







Edited by - apswater on October 13 2005 20:20:17

searley
VP-ASP New User

169 Posts

Posted - October 13 2005 :  11:06:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If 404 errors are you main concern??

you could use a custom 404 redirect so that instead of a 404 being shown they are redirected to the home page

Go to Top of Page

apswater
VP-ASP Super User

317 Posts

Posted - October 13 2005 :  12:13:43  Show Profile  Visit apswater's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks, yes I figured I could do that, but I would rather not have those pages in the search engine if there is a way.

Radek Rekas of tech service passed me this link
http://www.google.com/intl/en/remove.html

I havent read it all of it yet, but it is a good link.

Go to Top of Page

apswater
VP-ASP Super User

317 Posts

Posted - October 13 2005 :  12:24:53  Show Profile  Visit apswater's Homepage  Reply with Quote
While I was reading that stuff, I can across this page...

There is someone here who keeps pushing shared link sheme.
It is addressed here as something you definatly do not want to do.

Search Engine Optimizers

SEO is an abbreviation for "search engine optimizer." Many SEOs provide useful services for website owners, from writing copy to giving advice on site architecture and helping to find relevant directories to which a site can be submitted. However, a few unethical SEOs have given the industry a black eye through their overly aggressive marketing efforts and their attempts to unfairly manipulate search engine results.

While Google doesn't have relationships with any SEOs and doesn't offer recommendations, we do have a few tips that may help you distinguish between an SEO that will improve your site and one that will only improve your chances of being dropped from search engine results altogether.

Be wary of SEO firms that send you email out of the blue.
Amazingly, we get these spam emails too:

"Dear google.com,
I visited your website and noticed that you are not listed in most of the major search engines and directories..."
Reserve the same skepticism for unsolicited email about search engines as you do for "burn fat at night" diet pills or requests to help transfer funds from deposed dictators.

No one can guarantee a #1 ranking on Google.
Beware of SEOs that claim to guarantee rankings, allege a "special relationship" with Google, or advertise a "priority submit" to Google. There is no priority submit for Google. In fact, the only way to submit a site to Google directly is through our Add URL page or through the Google Sitemaps (Beta) program, and you can do this yourself at no cost whatsoever.

Be careful if a company is secretive or won't clearly explain what they intend to do.
Ask for explanations if something is unclear. If an SEO creates deceptive or misleading content on your behalf, such as doorway pages or "throwaway" domains, your site could be removed entirely from Google's index. Ultimately, you are responsible for the actions of any companies you hire, so it's best to be sure you know exactly how they intend to "help" you.

You should never have to link to an SEO.
Avoid SEOs that talk about the power of "free-for-all" links, link popularity schemes, or submitting your site to thousands of search engines. These are typically useless exercises that don't affect your ranking in the results of the major search engines -- at least, not in a way you would likely consider to be positive.

Some SEOs may try to sell you the ability to type keywords directly into the browser address bar.
Most such proposals require users to install extra software, and very few users do so. Evaluate such proposals with extreme care and be skeptical about the self-reported number of users who have downloaded the required applications.

Choose wisely.
While you consider whether to go with an SEO, you may want to do some research on the industry. Google is one way to do that of course. You might also seek out a few of the cautionary tales that have appeared in the press, including this article on one particularly aggressive SEO: http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/businesstechnology/2002002970_nwbizbriefs12.html. While Google doesn't comment on specific companies, we've encountered firms calling themselves SEOs who follow practices that are clearly beyond the pale of accepted business behavior. Be careful.

Be sure to understand where the money goes.
While Google never sells better ranking in our search results, several other search engines combine pay-per-click or pay-for-inclusion results with their regular web search results. Some SEOs will promise to rank you highly in search engines, but place you in the advertising section rather than in the search results. A few SEOs will even change their bid prices in real time to create the illusion that they "control" other search engines and can place themselves in the slot of their choice. This scam doesn't work with Google because our advertising is clearly labeled and separated from our search results, but be sure to ask any SEO you're considering which fees go toward permanent inclusion and which apply toward temporary advertising.

Talk to many SEOs, and ask other SEOs if they'd recommend the firm you're considering.
References are a good start, but they don't tell the whole story. You should ask how long a company has been in business and how many full time individuals it employs. If you feel pressured or uneasy, go with your gut feeling and play it safe: hold off until you find a firm that you can trust. Ask your SEO firm if it reports every spam abuse that it finds to Google using our spam complaint form at http://www.google.com/contact/spamreport.html. Ethical SEO firms report deceptive sites that violate Google's spam guidelines.

Make sure you're protected legally.
For your own safety, you should insist on a full and unconditional money-back guarantee. Don't be afraid to request a refund if you're unsatisfied for any reason, or if your SEO's actions cause your domain to be removed from a search engine's index. Make sure you have a contract in writing that includes pricing. The contract should also require the SEO to stay within the guidelines recommended by each search engine for site inclusion.

What are the most common abuses a website owner is likely to encounter?

One common scam is the creation of "shadow" domains that funnel users to a site by using deceptive redirects. These shadow domains often will be owned by the SEO who claims to be working on a client's behalf. However, if the relationship sours, the SEO may point the domain to a different site, or even to a competitor's domain. If that happens, the client has paid to develop a competing site owned entirely by the SEO.

Another illicit practice is to place "doorway" pages loaded with keywords on the client's site somewhere. The SEO promises this will make the page more relevant for more queries. This is inherently false since individual pages are rarely relevant for a wide range of keywords. More insidious, however, is that these doorway pages often contain hidden links to the SEO's other clients as well. Such doorway pages drain away the link popularity of a site and route it to the SEO and its other clients, which may include sites with unsavory or illegal content.

What are some other things to look out for?

There are a few warning signs that you may be dealing with a rogue SEO. It's far from a comprehensive list, so if you have any doubts, you should trust your instincts. By all means, feel free to walk away if the SEO:

owns shadow domains
puts links to their other clients on doorway pages
offers to sell keywords in the address bar
doesn't distinguish between actual search results and ads that appear in search results
guarantees ranking, but only on obscure, long keyword phrases you would get anyway
operates with multiple aliases or falsified WHOIS info
gets traffic from "fake" search engines, spyware, or scumware
has had domains removed from Google's index or is not itself listed in Google
If you feel that you were deceived by an SEO in some way, you may want to report it.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) handles complaints about deceptive or unfair business practices. To file a complaint, visit: http://www.ftc.gov/ and click on "File a Complaint Online," call 1-877-FTC-HELP, or write to:

Federal Trade Commission
CRC-240
Washington, D.C. 20580
If your complaint is against a company in another country, please file it at http://www.econsumer.gov/.


Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Snitz Forums 2000